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Worlds Unite Part Four: Death and Destruction

Line Art: Dan Schoening

Colors: Luis Delgado

Letters: Jack Morelli


    We now come to the point where things start to wind down. With the story finally getting to the point where all the main characters meet up, the first part of this crossover is drawing to a close, and with that, there needs to be set up for the next part. This time, the fight between M’egga Man and Sonic Man is the backdrop for the real action: the worlds are fusing together, and the Freedom Fighters and the Robot Masters must work together to save people during the chaos. Indeed there is a lot of chaos, so much so that I had a hard time figuring out what was going on during some of the action bits. As M’egga Man and Sonic Man hit each other with their biggest attacks, Eggman’s and Wily’s Programming kicks in, turning them back to normal. I have to admit, when I first read the text explaining to the heroes what was up, I thought some third party came in to save them.


    Just over halfway through this comic comes the event that completely ruins the stakes of the comic. Funnily enough, it was editorially mandated in order to “raise” the stakes. I am, of course, talking about the death of team Dark, including Shadow the Hedgehog. I feel the main problem with the Sonic comic, the one aspect that makes it so it can never be as good as Mega Man, is that SEGA does not play ball.


    SEGA has a track record with the comic in making really weird demands, mostly because they are interested in keeping Sonic as a brand as sterile as Mickey Mouse is often seen by people. Things have to be the way SEGA dictates them to be, and they will often contradict themselves or forget what they own or don’t own. Knowing this, I can safely say there is no way that SEGA would ever allow Archie to permanently kill off Shadow the Hedgehog. Nack the Weasel, maybe, or anyone else from the Classic Era that didn’t make it to the transition to modern, but not Shadow. Never. I actually glossed over the scene the first time, and when someone told me that Shadow was dead, I actually had to read this issue again to see for myself. Sure enough, they imply his demise, but never outright say it (probably because Archie didn’t get permission from SEGA to kill him off, anyway). I could go on about how SEGA dictates their properties or how Archie’s attempts to circumvent them went from charming to annoying, but that isn’t the purpose of this review.


    What is important to note, however, is that this event solidifies the crossover in “retcon” territory. With Shadow blown to smithereens (albeit with a mountain of plausible deniability), there is no way this crossover won’t end with a cosmic reset to put things back they way they were: no stakes, no changes in the status quo, not even a reboot as Tracey Yardley! doesn’t seem like he wants to take Captain Metal away from Archie just yet and make a bunch of patches and iPhone cases of the guy.


    It is at this point in the comic where “Worlds Unite” goes from being a part of the narrative of the three comic universes to being a story in its own right, to be enjoyed on its own by its own merits, much like Sonic 06. And that’s not the only thing it has in common to Sonic 06.


    This story offers a bunch of confusing action and promises to the reader that this comic can possibly do whatever it wants, because its going to fix itself at the end of all of this, anyway. That could be a good thing, and they do promise something cool when all the heroes finally meet up and Sigma teases that he has a mechaniloid army ready to face them when they go to fight him.


The Choice

Pencils: Powree

Inks: Rick Byrant

Colors: Luis Delgado and Anna Chher

Letters: Jack Morelli


    Since part four of Worlds Unite happens to be Mega Man issue #50, it has an expanded page count, and with it comes a back-up story. This is the best part of the issue by far, and probably one of my top three chapters of Worlds Unite. One thing that had people apprehensive of a crossover between X and Mega Man was that it meant characters like Dr. Light and the blue bomber will know what lies in their future. And really, a lot of Worlds Unite caused problems for a lot of the Mega Man fans, as it sits in a part of the story where Mega Man believes Dr. Wily is dead. And if Dr. Light and Dr. Wily met their future creations, does it mean that them building X and Zero was predestined by a time loop? After all, by this point, Dr. Light has seen X and has been told about who and what Sigma is, so he knows what the future would hold. Perhaps after I’m done writing these reviews, I will go into what I would have done if I had written Worlds Unite.


    The story gives people unfamiliar with both Mega Man and X a chance to learn about the characters and their backstory as the two introduce themselves to each other. Fans of the X series also get a few pages dedicated to adapting events prior to the first X game, as well as having X explain how his character developed throughout the series, even learning from his lowest point in X7. Ian even touches on the differences between the free-willed X and the programmed Mega Man. When the bomb finally drops that X was built by Dr. Light, and X even contemplates preventing his own creation to stop all the suffering from happening, Mega Man gives him what I think would be the most perfect answer.

Worlds Unite Part Three: Clash of the Corrupted

Pencil Breakdowns: Dan Schoening

Pencil Finishers: Tracy Yardley!

Inks: Terry Austin

Colors: Luis Delgado

Letters: Jack Morelli


    Part Three of Worlds Unite is the high point for me. The fights that are here are fun, and the biggest part I like is that it feels like a natural fit for both worlds. We see Mobotropolis and the Freedom Fighters fighting M’egga Man, which solidifies the series as being a part of the comics’ timeline. M’egga’s abilities are a fun reference to Eggman fights of the past, and watching the Robot Masters go all out was also really neat. Seeing Gemerl for the first time was nice, and it seems that he has become a replacement for Shard.


    That’s not to say that I don’t have my problems with this issue. Gemerl shows up only to be blasted back, to show off how powerful M’egga Man is, for starters.Secondly, I can’t help but feel that certain Robot masters in the previous Mega Man story volunteered to be shut off soley because Ian Flynn didn’t want to use them in the crossover. After all, during Curse of Ra Moon, one of the most compelling points of that story was when Gemini Man argued with himself about how he was designed to be a mining robot, yet leading up to Unite, he resigned himself to being shut off because he felt he wasn’t of any use.


    Ian Flynn writing characters to fit plots instead of writing plots to fit characters has been a complaint I’ve seen around the internet so far, and it is during this very issue that I started to see that happening.

Mega Man Worlds Unite Battles #1


    One of the first missteps in the revelation of Worlds Unite was that an early interview said that there would be a Worlds Unite miniseries. While Ian Flynn was quick to clarify that wasn’t the case, I know many of us were upset that wasn’t the case. Worlds Collide, despite being very important in turning Sonic around to the reboot, was seen as “wasting” four months of story time. With the imminent “hiatus” of Mega Man, a complaint is that Unite made readers lose precious story. Personally, would have rather a story of this kind happen “behind the scenes,” while the comics continued along their merry way. That way, subscribers wouldn’t be forced to wait for the stories to continue.


    Even though we didn’t get that miniseries, what we did get was two side books, both titled Worlds Unite Battles, but confusing audiences everywhere by being Sonic Worlds Unite Battles and Mega Man Worlds Unite Battles. Both, of course, were labeled as #1 issues. The two books display stories from throughout the first half of the crossover, expanding upon events seen in the chapters and giving characters much needed time to breathe and giving the staff time to flesh out fights so they weren’t crammed.


    I can see why they decided to make these comics. After all, “wasting” three months of the readers’ time on a crossover that the writers probably saw as tumultuous on their end and uncertain on fan reception was probably too much, so to ease the fans requests for more one offs like the days of yore, they decided to release these two books. I’m glad that they did, because two of the best parts of the series appear throughout these issues. Sadly, the fact that they are in side comics means that some of the best (or rather, most of the good) moments of the story are easily skipped, especially since one can only obtain these issues by going to a Local Comic Shop that supplies them.


Mega Man vs Deadly 3

Artist: Ben Bates

Letters: Rachel Deering


    Starting this story off, we have the first use of a big-name artist in the crossover Ben Bates’ artwork really brings the story to life and shows a skill for the characters he is representing. Not only that, but there is a real fresh charm to the way characters are introduced and how sound effects are presented. The sterile narration boxes are replaced by action-packed word art that introduces the characters one-by-one to the audience, instead of just dumping them with no explanation as is earlier. We get banter from the Deadly Six that explains who they are and what their abilities are. Not only that, but the way they defeat Mega Man is probably the first time I felt the villains were a real threat. Had I been in charge of the story, I would have had this be part of Part 1, and use part 2 to explain the villains after the sudden attack that took booth the heroes, and the readers, by surprise. In fact, this method of in medias res could have removed a lot of the plot hole problems I had with part one.


Maverick Hunters versus Vile

Pencils: Jamal Peppers

Inks: Terry Austin

Letters: Rachel Deering

Colors: Elaina Unger


    The second story of the special fills in the gap between what happened with the Maverick hunters between part one and part 2. Unlike the first, which was basically exclusively Ben Bates, the team here is mixed between people known in Archie, and those cutting their teeth on the comic. It also shows where Silver went after his exploits in the lead-in from Sonic Universe. While Vile being dealt with here means that we won’t be seeing him later on, putting this story in part one as well would have shown exactly what happened. A lot of the Eggman and Wily scenes could have been cut out, allowing the reader to see things transpire from the heroes’ side.


Sonic Man vs the Robot Masters

Writer: T-Rex

Art: Brent McCarthy

Letters: Rachel Deering

Colors: Elaina Linger


    The charm of this piece is that it is both written and illustrated by unconventional people, and, in this case, I feel the experiment was a success. The opening narration between Eggman and Wily is verbose with silly technobabble and the scientists gloating. We also get a more in-depth explanation on how Sonic Man works, something M’egga Man doesn’t get. A shame, since he’s my favorite of the two. T-Rex seems to be having fun with the characters in how he writes them, and the art gives a fight that dynamically flows through each of the panels, making the art and panel-layout feel impactful. That’s much more than what I can say about the finale fights, but we’ll get to them soon enough. Sonic Man is also quite threatening, something Metal Sonic hasn’t been in a long while, and we finally get to see Fire Man do something, despite Ian Flynn putting him on the wayside compared to the other DLNs.


    All in all, the package of the Battle Books is a much more fresh and fun set of stories than the slow build that had been going on in the comic up until the point leading to part 3. Considering the doubling up on both the recap of Worlds Collide and the explanations recapping things that happened earlier in the crossover itself, there could have probably been room to place these stories into the crossover itself, instead of in its own work.

Worlds Unite! Part Two: Broken Heroes

Pencil BreakDowns: Dan Schoening

Finishes: Tracy Yardley!

Inks: Terry Austin

Letters: Jack Morelli

Colors: Luis Delgado


    Let it be known now that I don’t dislike the first four issues of Worlds Unite. In fact, the contrary is true. I love these issues. Not so much the first one, but it does its job. A rocky start is no indication of a terrible finish. Lots of stories have foundations in terrible beginnings. Ian Flynn made a career out of making terrible stories and characters into something people wanted to read.


    One thing you might notice is the fact that the comic constantly rotates its art team. That’s certainly a different approach than Collide, but where that series set to bring out its A-game, this far more experimental and daunting task was given to a bunch of untested artists. A bold move, and one that does not pay off, as much of the art does not work as well as it should. Last issue had Sonic looking a little uncanny, but this one just has stiff action, especially where the Maverick Hunters are concerned.


    This issue does not waste any time. It spends a page introducing Sticks and showing what happened last issue when she saw X emerge from the portal, and we quickly learn that Silver met X and the others (a bit we miss, but its told that we can read it in the Battle Book, so its all good). A big surprise comes in the fact that Sticks brings Comedy Chimp and Fastidious Beaver along for the ride to Boom Eggman’s lair so they can highjack his teleportation device. We get a scene with Orbot and Cubot (with no explanation that they are different than the main universe counterparts. A small gripe, but whatever) and then we return to the main plot.


    It’s back on Lost Hex where Eggman explains to Wily and the Audience how the heck Worlds Collide works in relation to both Mega Man’s time travel, and Sonic’s world reboot. The recap here serves its purpose and shows much more effort than many of the continuity hitches that were happening in the previous part.


    By far the best part about this issue is the end, with the introduction of M’egga Man and Sonic Man. We are given multiple pages within each universe to show that we are, in fact, dealing with the characters and their worlds. Dr. Light and co are worried about Mega Man and the freedom fighters were worried about Sonic. Where Part one felt like some weird trip into an alternate reality, in terms of storytelling, this issue feels like a proper introduction to the story and the world it takes place in. In fact, a reader can probably skip part one altogether and get all the information they need from this story and Mega Man: Worlds Collide Battles #1

Part One: Worlds Unite! Part One Across Time & Space (A Rocky Start)

Writer: Ian Flynn

Line Art: Dan Schoening

Colors: Luis Antonio Delgado

Letters: Jack Morelli

Editor: Vincent Lovallo


    As you can tell from the credits, this is the first issue in our review to be edited by Vincent Lovallo. Now, Paul Kaminski has been the editor for the comic since Mike Pellerito left. Pellerito was known as the guy who got rid of Penders and kicked Archie into gear. While I personally have spoken to Kaminski in the past, and he seemed to be a really nice guy, a lot of the business decisions during his run have been head-scratching affairs. It is through him that Mega Man was created as a series to fit four-issue arcs for trade publications, and through him that every summer we have seen an event in the book. We also learned about half-way through the event that some of the weirder aspects of the story were leftovers from when he planned it out with Ian, so I would say don’t judge Lovallo’s ability as an editor on this story. However, he’s going to have the burden of being the editor who put Mega Man on hiatus, I’m sure.


    Anyway, the comic itself. The comics that lead into the crossover need to tie themselves into the upcoming story, but perhaps more importantly, a story like this needs to tie itself into the continuity and timeline of the comics that spawned it. Part 1 attempts this, but I feel its biggest shortcomings is how it doesn’t do it as well as it should.


    In Worlds Collide, we had each issue preceding it revealing to the audience that Eggman and Wily had been collaborating, and the two main books both ended with their Genesis wave firing off. In Part 1 of that crossover, then, we saw just how the two met, and then we saw them firing the wave itself, bringing resolution to the build-up. None of that is present in Worlds Unite.


    We start in Mega Man X, which opens on X and friends attacking Sigma’s base at some point after the events of X7, as Axl is included in this crossover. What is the reason to skip ahead so far into X? Probably to include the Mavericks later on, so with the Mavericks we see in the upcoming issues, we can conclude that this takes place after X8, and after X and company deal with the cliffhanger that happened in the story. Of course, this doesn’t make sense, because Sigma is supposedly “dead forever.” after X8. Now, if we take Mega Man Zero into account, Sigma doesn’t fully die until the Mother Elf destroys the virus, so its not that big of a deal, in that case.


    To complicate matters further, Ian Flynn says that this crossover takes place before X8, which leads to a few problems of its own, and, I believe, to be more problematic to reconcile. First of all, Axl meets Vile here. There is no going around that. He meets and fights Vile, yet, in X8, Axl acts as if he doesn’t know Vile, and Zero has to fill him in on the character’s backstory. Even with how this comic is going to end, that point still exists. Axl has met Vile, and suddenly forgets all about him by the time X8 starts. Not only that, but when Sigma revives the dead Mavericks, he revives Mavericks he hasn’t even met yet from X8, so he could have just as easily been a newly evil Sigma throwing Mavericks from the future at X and Zero. It’s not like Axl contributes anything to the plot (nor X or Zero themselves, really).


    Skip over to Sonic. Sonic runs through Green Hill zone, because apparently every crossover needs him to start there, for some reason. We aren’t really told how he got to Green Hill all the way from Apotos. Its another jump. Maybe if one of the issues prior told Sonic there was an emerald in Green Hill, but was more of a general “hey, let’s find the emeralds,” so there goes another chance to connect things.


    The comic jumps to Mega Man and Light labs, where Mega Man and Elec Man are installing the electricity in the generator, restoring power after the events of Mega Man 3’s arc. I like that we get to see where the heroes are from their previous adventure, but there’s a flaw that is never addressed here: If Dr. Light didn’t have electricity, how was he able to repair the Robot Masters from Mega Man 2 and Mega Man 3? This wouldn’t have been a major problem, had the previous issue not all been about repairing them, powering them up, and then turning off the ones that don’t want to function.


    The final place we visit is Eggman’s base on Lost Hex, and my biggest grievance in the continuity of this story. Much of the exposition is told here in a diary that Dr. Eggman is keeping. In it, he explains he went to Lost Hex to “get a new perspective” on things going on in the planet. There’s no explanation what he means by that, as the comics were in the middle of adapting Sonic Unleashed. In that game, Eggman was busy building Eggmanland and creating siphons to absorb Dark Gaia energy. In Sonic Lost World, Eggman’s plan is to enslave the Zeti in order to have them comand his Badnik army, which he makes by capturing animals and turning them into robots in his factory on Lost Hex.


    Not only do these plans not really have anything to do with each other, as his badniks are there to smash Sonic, not build buildings for him, but we never see the logistics of how Eggman got from point A to Point B. Eggman was already in lost Hex in the previous issue of Sonic Universe, which means that even before the crossover, he would have gone to Lost Hex. Remember that, because that will be important for later. But not only that, but while Eggman was busy recovering from his shattered memories of the previous world and taking stock of his broken army on the shattered planet, he somehow had the time to research the Zeti and find that Cacpohonic Conch so he can control them.


    Next on the list is Sigma. When we are introduced to him in the beginning of the story, he is already well-aware of Dr. Eggman and how the Genesis Portals work. There is no indication of how or why he got the information, or what his plan is, as of yet. He eventually explains he wishes to obtain godhood. I’m not sure I buy this motivation for Sigma. Sigma’s MO is more of a crazy sort of guy who wants to destroy things, not raise himself up to a loftier position. Though his motivations do seem to change every game, so its not that big of an issue, just another little bit of weirdness. He also makes reference to having his “traditional” 8 generals, yet the 8 bosses players tend to fight in the X series don’t follow Sigma directly, in most cases. It’s only in a few cases where they are actually his commanders or generals or the like, and there are actually a few where Sigma’s appearance is a bit of a surprise. After all, in X6, Sigma is basically an afterthought, rebuilt by Gate because the guy was nuts.


    The other problem with how expositional this issue is that the Deadly Six get the short end of the stick. They are characters known for their colorful, if one dimensional, personalities. Yet we don’t see that here. Heck, we’re not going to see that in all of the numbered entries of this crossover. When I first read this issue, I wondered why the Zeti were even in this crossover, and I know now, but wish I hadn’t. We’ll get to that, when it’s time to review part 7, of course.

Worlds Unite Part Four: Death and Destruction

Line Art: Dan Schoening

Colors: Luis Delgado

Letters: Jack Morelli


    We now come to the point where things start to wind down. With the story finally getting to the point where all the main characters meet up, the first part of this crossover is drawing to a close, and with that, there needs to be set up for the next part. This time, the fight between M’egga Man and Sonic Man is the backdrop for the real action: the worlds are fusing together, and the Freedom Fighters and the Robot Masters must work together to save people during the chaos. Indeed there is a lot of chaos, so much so that I had a hard time figuring out what was going on during some of the action bits. As M’egga Man and Sonic Man hit each other with their biggest attacks, Eggman’s and Wily’s Programming kicks in, turning them back to normal. I have to admit, when I first read the text explaining to the heroes what was up, I thought some third party came in to save them.


    Just over halfway through this comic comes the event that completely ruins the stakes of the comic. Funnily enough, it was editorially mandated in order to “raise” the stakes. I am, of course, talking about the death of team Dark, including Shadow the Hedgehog. I feel the main problem with the Sonic comic, the one aspect that makes it so it can never be as good as Mega Man, is that SEGA does not play ball.


    SEGA has a track record with the comic in making really weird demands, mostly because they are interested in keeping Sonic as a brand as sterile as Mickey Mouse is often seen by people. Things have to be the way SEGA dictates them to be, and they will often contradict themselves or forget what they own or don’t own. Knowing this, I can safely say there is no way that SEGA would ever allow Archie to permanently kill off Shadow the Hedgehog. Nack the Weasel, maybe, or anyone else from the Classic Era that didn’t make it to the transition to modern, but not Shadow. Never. I actually glossed over the scene the first time, and when someone told me that Shadow was dead, I actually had to read this issue again to see for myself. Sure enough, they imply his demise, but never outright say it (probably because Archie didn’t get permission from SEGA to kill him off, anyway). I could go on about how SEGA dictates their properties or how Archie’s attempts to circumvent them went from charming to annoying, but that isn’t the purpose of this review.


    What is important to note, however, is that this event solidifies the crossover in “retcon” territory. With Shadow blown to smithereens (albeit with a mountain of plausible deniability), there is no way this crossover won’t end with a cosmic reset to put things back they way they were: no stakes, no changes in the status quo, not even a reboot as Tracey Yardley! doesn’t seem like he wants to take Captain Metal away from Archie just yet and make a bunch of patches and iPhone cases of the guy.


    It is at this point in the comic where “Worlds Unite” goes from being a part of the narrative of the three comic universes to being a story in its own right, to be enjoyed on its own by its own merits, much like Sonic 06. And that’s not the only thing it has in common to Sonic 06.


    This story offers a bunch of confusing action and promises to the reader that this comic can possibly do whatever it wants, because its going to fix itself at the end of all of this, anyway. That could be a good thing, and they do promise something cool when all the heroes finally meet up and Sigma teases that he has a mechaniloid army ready to face them when they go to fight him.


The Choice

Pencils: Powree

Inks: Rick Byrant

Colors: Luis Delgado and Anna Chher

Letters: Jack Morelli


    Since part four of Worlds Unite happens to be Mega Man issue #50, it has an expanded page count, and with it comes a back-up story. This is the best part of the issue by far, and probably one of my top three chapters of Worlds Unite. One thing that had people apprehensive of a crossover between X and Mega Man was that it meant characters like Dr. Light and the blue bomber will know what lies in their future. And really, a lot of Worlds Unite caused problems for a lot of the Mega Man fans, as it sits in a part of the story where Mega Man believes Dr. Wily is dead. And if Dr. Light and Dr. Wily met their future creations, does it mean that them building X and Zero was predestined by a time loop? After all, by this point, Dr. Light has seen X and has been told about who and what Sigma is, so he knows what the future would hold. Perhaps after I’m done writing these reviews, I will go into what I would have done if I had written Worlds Unite.


    The story gives people unfamiliar with both Mega Man and X a chance to learn about the characters and their backstory as the two introduce themselves to each other. Fans of the X series also get a few pages dedicated to adapting events prior to the first X game, as well as having X explain how his character developed throughout the series, even learning from his lowest point in X7. Ian even touches on the differences between the free-willed X and the programmed Mega Man. When the bomb finally drops that X was built by Dr. Light, and X even contemplates preventing his own creation to stop all the suffering from happening, Mega Man gives him what I think would be the most perfect answer.

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Mavrickindigo
Stephen Carnaggio
Artist | Hobbyist | Literature
United States
Current Residence: USA
Favourite genre of music: Videogame/Movie soundtracks
Favourite style of art: character art/comics
Operating System: Windows 7
MP3 player of choice: My computer
Shell of choice: sea shell
Wallpaper of choice: That Mega Man Powered Up
Skin of choice: mine
Favourite cartoon character: Hexidecimal (Reboot)
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:iconmj-of-the-universe:
MJ-OF-THE-UNIVERSE Featured By Owner Aug 8, 2015  New Deviant
Hey mavrik

Ive been reading through your stories (awesome by the way)

But i cant put my finger on what veshra actually looks like :). Would u mind helping me out?

(Her natural form of course)
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:iconmavrickindigo:
Mavrickindigo Featured By Owner Aug 8, 2015  Hobbyist Writer
Ah, well, you can see many artists' renditions of her in my favorites, as she's one people love to draw
mavrickindigo.deviantart.com/f…

this would be the "go to" version, I think
mavrickindigo.deviantart.com/a…
but I like this as a "candid" shot of her
db-riddle.deviantart.com/art/V…
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:iconsurrealbrain:
SurrealBrain Featured By Owner May 8, 2015
Thanks for the watch, Mavrick.
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:iconmavrickindigo:
Mavrickindigo Featured By Owner May 8, 2015  Hobbyist Writer
yep! wish I knew you were on here sooner, would have done it sooner
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:iconcartoonking1:
cartoonking1 Featured By Owner Mar 16, 2015
Happy birthday. :D
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:iconmavrickindigo:
Mavrickindigo Featured By Owner Mar 16, 2015  Hobbyist Writer
thanks!
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:iconcartoonking1:
cartoonking1 Featured By Owner Mar 16, 2015
Welcome. :hug:
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:iconmavrickindigo:
Mavrickindigo Featured By Owner Mar 17, 2015  Hobbyist Writer
:D
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(1 Reply)
:iconsonicgal390:
SonicGal390 Featured By Owner Mar 16, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
:icondjpon-3plz::iconpinkiepieplz: HAPPY BIRTHDAY! :party::iconcookiecakeplz::iconcakecookieplz::cake::cookie::milk::party::iconpinkiepartyplz::iconcarameldansenplz::iconcheerplz::iconvictorydanceplz::iconhappybirthdayplz::iconballoonsplz::iconskyepartyplz::iconomgcakeplz::iconfuncakeplz::iconcumple1plz::iconcumple2plz::iconcaekglompplz::iconcaekplz::icongiftplz::iconbummyballoonplz::iconcake3dplz::iconhappybirthdaysignplz::iconpresentplz::iconrainbowbummiecakeplz::iconheartballoonplz::iconforyouplz::icondjpon3plz::iconrainbowcakeplz::iconplaywithfireplz::iconbonklers::iconpineappletardplz::iconhappybirthday2plz::iconbummiesplz::iconlaplayplz::iconlabeatplz::iconballoonplz:
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:iconmavrickindigo:
Mavrickindigo Featured By Owner Mar 16, 2015  Hobbyist Writer
That's dedication. Thanks!
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